Videoblogging heats up in China as well…

China's First Annual Original Videolog Contest

If you’re still debating on whether videoblogging will really hit it big (Rocketboom = $85,000 per week?), here’s another surprise for you. Virtual China, a research blog by the Institute for the Future, claims that two of the most well-known online video clips come from greater China…

Heard of the “Asian Backstreet Boys” and a lesser known clip called “Bus Uncle” (it’s subtitled)?

With China enormous population size, it’s highly probable for the Chinese to produce a pool of talented individuals to really rock this blog space. Don’t underestimate these Chinese youths, who are armed with video cellphones, digital video cameras, and broadband. Futhermore, thanks to the advent of video sharing services, they’re churning out clips by the millions.

Adding to this, their pursuits are being encouraged and disseminated by China’s top research academics and burgeoning vlogging sites. Communication University, Beijing Film Academy, the Central Academy of Drama, vvlogger.com, PodLook.com, and UUSee.com are in the midst of accepting submissions for China’s First Annual Original Videolog Contest.

Prizes of 3000 RMB (about 450 USD) will be given for Best Director, Most Original, and Most Popular. Submissions accepted until July 10, online voting until July 25, and prizes announced August 10.

If anything, this space is really heating up. It’s be interesting to see whether videoblogging matures as a long-tail (read: niche) personal media or a form of mass media like television (did I make sense?).

Read more at Virtual China…

UPDATE: Elia Diodati wrote about the “Bus Uncle” video, how infamous it became (think YouTube top spot and a Chinese MTV), and whether the “anglosphere” (English-speaking blogosphere) can play well with Asian cultures.

2 thoughts on “Videoblogging heats up in China as well…

  1. mervkwok: As you’ve mentioned, there’s a trend going on with episodic content which has gone beyond the TV. By releasing content over a longer period of time, producers can milk it for extended viewership and ad revenue, which performs particularly well for the web as a medium (web is cheaper to lease). We’re beginning to see this in games as well, where Half-Life 2 recently release episode 1 of 3 as well as SIN. I wonder what other content can be episodic. It’s like subscription without the commitment.

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